Thursday, October 21, 2010

Not To Sound Like a Broken Record...

Actually, I don't think I will. Instead, I have a question:

How many people, when they hear that phrase, know what a broken record sounds like? Do any kids today know it? At what age does it go from being something that has no relevance to something that, for me at least, brings up specific LPs that stuck and repeated like, well, like broken records.

Writing for kids, we're always told it's best to avoid slang that dates your book (unless you're trying to be of a certain time, of course). I wonder if a phrase like this, which is one I can use naturally, is going to disappear from the lexicon? And what other phrases are like this, based on something that we just don't experience with regularity anymore?

5 comments:

Amy LV said...

Somehow, "You sound like a broken ipod," just doesn't have the same ring to it! Hmmm...now I am going to be listening to just how dated I sound. A.

Terry Doherty said...

Here's a nickel call someone who cares? Kids are glued to their phones, but have no concept of payphones!

Heading to a wedding tomorrow, I'm betting I'll hear lots of those phrases ... like "Holy go to war Miss Agnes."

Jane Heitman Healy said...

Good question, Greg. I'm thinking today's kids think a broken record is running the fastest in a race. What would that sound like? And what about the song that goes "Put another dime in the jukebox, baby"?

Rusty B. said...

How about the whole concept of TV. How long before what used to be TV comes on an internet stream. What's the big deal with channels. You can have as many different streams as you want on the internet. Cellphone. What's that. The personal communication device connects through global wifi. Just like my hand held computer.

Ms. Yingling said...

There are some phrases that are still used even though the origins are lost. People still "dial" a phone. We type instead of word process. I even hear a few people my age use "ice box". I'll have to check with my students today. They do NOT get analog time, that I know.